Facebook Fights Revenge Porn: Protecting Yourself Online

Facebook uses it’s platform to combat nonconsensual pornography.

Revenge porn, or nonconsensual pornography, is defined by the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative as “the distribution of sexually graphic images of individuals without their consent.”

Facebook is taking steps to fight this devastating issue. In April 2017 they released tools that utilize trained moderators to review intimate images that have been reported for appearing to be posted without the subject’s permission. If the moderator determines there is ground to remove the image, Facebook is able to use “photo-matching technologies” to prevent that picture from being shared anywhere else on their platforms, including Messenger and Instagram.

Recently, Facebook expanded on these reporting tools by testing a new program, starting in Australia. Their new program will allow users to be proactive in preventing their intimate images from being posted without their permission. If someone suspects there’s a risk that nonconsensual pornography will be distributed of them on Facebook’s platforms, they can record these concerns and the photo-matching technologies can prevent the pictures from being shared in the first place.

This is a great step forward in combatting revenge porn, but it is important to understand where you still may be exposed to risk and why it is vital to invest in online image protection.

These programs only apply to content shared on Facebook’s platforms. The internet has countless outlets that exist solely to distribute revenge porn, and infinitely more that provide a unintentional platform for this activity. Make sure that you are protected by software that will search all across the web for misuse of your images and remove them no matter where they are hiding.

This WILL NOT cover your images if they are posted anywhere outside of Facebook or it’s properties, and for the short term outside of Australia. We need a bigger concentrated effort to make a difference, as it is not common for someone to post revenge porn on Facebook.

Discovery and reporting is still effectively the victim’s responsibility. Unfortunately, as progressive as this new program is, it still places the responsibility of finding and challenging the damaging images on the victim. If you are unaware that someone has access to intimate images of you or that they would have motivation to post them, these pictures could circulate unchecked, undermining your reputation and your relationships.

Facebook has taken an important first step to protecting you on their platforms. Are you doing everything possible to protect yourself online by investing in online image protection? FaceChex offers protection plans for all budgets that will protect your online content from unauthorized use. Sign up today!

Watch some of our interviews on revenge porn and it’s affect on social media and peoples lives. Find more videos like the below on our YoutubeChannel

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