Ohio Democrat to Introduce New Bill to Protect Victims of Revenge Porn

revenge porn victim

Break-ups can be messy and complicated, but once things have settled, you assume the worst is over. Unfortunately, in many cases, this is only the beginning of a devastating, heart-wrenching battle. Whether out of anger, spite, or in a lapse of judgement, an ex may choose to post intimate photos the two of you shared on the internet – and if you live in one of the twelve states that doesn’t have laws against this act, there may be little you can do to fight it in court. For now, that is.

The Badass Army, a non-profit organization created to combat revenge porn, showed their support today for Ohio Democrat Joe Schiavoni’s new bill. This bill will be structured to determine penalties for revenge porn offenders: a misdemeanor charge. It will also provide victim protections, such as paid leave for attending court dates and easing the process of suing the poster.

The bill will not only protect against sexually-explicit images shared by a previous partner, but against any person who posts these images without consent. (Private photos are also frequently obtained through hacking personal accounts or devices.)

Although this is an important step in the right direction, Katelyn Bowden, the leader of the Badass Army, says that it will still be difficult to take down the volume of abusive images that exist online. This difficulty is where FaceChex software can be so valuable. By using web-scanning and facial recognition to find and take down these images, it is possible to greatly reduce the spread of online image abuse, and therefore reduce the damaging impacts on victims’ lives.

Click here to watch our live interview with Katelyn Bowden, leader of the Badass Army to learn more about the fight against revenge porn and how you can get involved.

Interested to find out if there are any private images of yours that have been shared without your content? Sign up for FaceChex today!

Facebook Photos: Who owns my content?

We received a great question recently: Doesn’t Facebook own my photos?

It is a common misconception, that Facebook takes ownership of the content that you post, perpetuated by clickbait articles that encourage users to repost messages to their Timeline, claiming to protect you and your information.

Hoax Facebook Message
Example of hoax message

You Own Your Photos

Before you add this message as your own status: You still own the copyright to any photos you post on Facebook’s platform, and that is expressly stated in the terms and conditions you agree to when you sign up as a user.

Facebook Terms on Ownership of Content
Facebook’s Terms


Why is it easy to get confused about who owns your photos? You also agree, in the terms, that Facebook has a “non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license” to use your photos.

So Facebook has a license to use your photos, without paying or asking you, throughout the world. They can enter agreements with other companies to license your photos, and you are also allowed to license your photos to others (such as Instagram or Twitter.)

Licensing vs. Ownership

Why does Facebook require this license when you sign up? Imagine if every time someone searched your name, Facebook had to pay you a royalty fee to display your profile photo. Or, if every time you posted a picture to your timeline, Facebook had to get your express permission to show that to each of your friends. That wouldn’t be a very successful social network…

To be clear, giving Facebook a license to your photos does not give them copyright ownership of your photos. As long as it is content that you created, you are the sole owner of the copyright of those pictures and this is why copyright law is still valid to protect your Facebook pictures.

You Decide 

You have two key choices to make when controlling your content on Facebook. First, you can choose where your content will be available and who can see it by managing your privacy settings. Facebook’s license to display your content is limited based on these settings so they are an important tool to utilize.

If the broad license isn’t something you’re comfortable giving Facebook, you may also decide whether or not to delete your account entirely. After deleting your account, the license will end – but so will all of the benefits that you enjoy from having the account.

Either way, it is important to remember that you retain your rights as the copyright owner of any content you put on Facebook, and can exercise those rights if your content is found to be used without your permission.

Sign up for a FaceChex protection plan today to defend your online content.

Fighting Revenge Porn – Kickstarter Live interview with the Badass Army

Revenge Porn Activist Image Protection

You can run, you can hide, – you can post anonymously – but this army of badasses will find you…

Today we sat down with the “avenger” of revenge porn, Katelyn Bowden, the founder of the Badass Army, a group devoted to fighting online image abuse. Members banded together after their personal images were shared without consent on an anonymous chat board, and used to demean and humiliate them. Together, they have created a community of activists that work to protect their members as well as all others online from the abusive practice of revenge porn.

The group takes a vigilante approach to combatting revenge porn, as Katelyn describes in the interview. They reject the common saying that ‘if you didn’t want your images to be shared online, you shouldn’t take them.’ Instead, they work to protect others online because that type of victim-blaming has no place in their mission.

Watch the Kickstarter Live interview to learn more about the Badass Army’s mission and how FaceChex technology can help fight online image abuse!

You can support the Badass Army on their Go Fund Me page. Proceeds go toward their legal fees, helping others affected get their photos removed from the board, and helping victims process the emotional toll that this type of abuse has on their lives.

FaceChex in Forbes: 5 Online Safety Tips

Are you taking the necessary steps to be safe online? Or are you leaving yourself open to identity theft? Read FaceChex founder Mark Bauman’s latest Forbes article to find out.

The recent news has been filled with cases of public figures dealing with online identity theft, such as Myana Welch’s images being exploited on a fake escort ad, but people are often reluctant to believe this is something that could happen to them. Identity thieves capitalize on this disbelief. The article explains that a “Brazilian father was shocked to realize that his profile image had been copied and used to create a vehicle for Russian meddling in the U.S. election.”

Don’t let identity thieves hide behind your image to catfish, scam, or otherwise mislead others. Bauman explains the importance of privacy settings, vetting your social circle, and understanding the agreements you enter online. Along with educating yourself on online safety, make sure to pass on this information to others. Check out the FaceChex Kickstarter to create an online safety book for teens to order a book for your family and your local library!

You can watch the Kickstarter Live video on the article here.


Russian Meddling Perpetuated by Fake Profiles

When Facebook first admitted that 10 million people may have viewed Russian-sponsored ads on its platform, Facechex founder Mark Bauman was skeptical at how such a number could be so influential in the 2016 election. “ads on a pure numbers level have a .001% to (in extreme cases) 10% click-through ratio — the ratio of people who actually click an ad versus how many just see it.” Bauman explains in his Forbes article. This would mean that these ads would have only affected 10,000 people – hardly enough to sway the entire country’s election.

Bauman sat down for a Kickstarter Live interview to explain why a “complicated web of fake profiles across the social media sphere” is far more likely the vehicle used to influence the election. Facebook initially estimated that 6% of it’s user-base was comprised of fake or duplicate accounts.

And that number keeps growing. The latest estimates by Facebook put the estimate at 270 million fake accounts, or 10% of its user-base. Through Bauman’s estimates, he anticipates that number is closer to 500 million. We will be on the lookout for Facebook’s next update on its fake profile count…

In the meantime, check out FaceChex’s Kickstarter campaign to create an online safety book for teens.


Silence Breakers named TIME Person of the Year

The brave Silence Breakers behind the #metoo movement have been recognized as TIME’s Person of the Year. The idea was conceived in 2006 by Tamara Burke, but went viral after being posted by Alyssa Milano in October of 2017: “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” It has received over 66,000 responses so far.

The movement was described by Edward Felsenthal, TIME editor-in chief, as “the fastest moving social change we’ve seen in decades.” Not just women, but men are also coming forward to speak out about their experiences with sexual harassment and assault. The concept has permeated social media, inspiring victims to report the crimes against them, resulting in powerful men losing their jobs that once were able to shield themselves from retaliation.

You can watch the TIME piece on the Silence Breakers here:

Inspired by the Silence Breakers and the overwhelming impact of the #metoo movement, Miss Universe Guam, Myana Welch, has teamed up with us here at FaceChex to create a movement against online image abuse. When your image is stolen online, it affects you, the people in your social circle, as well as others online who are catfished, scammed, or hacked by someone using your photos. Online image abuse affects me, you, and #ustoo. #Ustoo is an outlet for victims of online image abuse such as revenge porn, identity theft, and hacking, to raise awareness and offer support to others.

Myana speaks to CBS8

Myana shared her story on the FaceChex Youtube channel, talking about how she dealt with finding out her photoshoot images had been sexualized and exploited on a fake online escort ad. She directed FaceChex to take down the pictures and spoke out about the lasting impact from the experience to CBS 8 San Diego to raise awareness on the issue of online image abuse.

If you have been affected by sexual harassment, assault, or online image abuse, know that you are not alone, and you can fight back. Through awareness and action it is possible to begin the healing process and prevent these crimes moving forward.

Are you ready to share your story of online image abuse, or offer your support to other victims? Use the tag #Ustoo to share your experience and get involved in the movement to end online image abuse. You can also reach out to FaceChex at info@facechex.com if you wish to share your story anonymously or need help getting stolen images removed online.


Kickstarter Live Interview with Miss Universe Guam

We hope you were able to tune in for today’s Kickstarter live interview with Miss Universe Guam, Myana Welch!

FaceChex founder, Mark Bauman, talked with Myana about her experience with online identity theft and how to protect yourself and your children from exploitation online.

If you missed the livestream, (or would like to watch it again!), please visit our Kickstarter page to watch a replay and order your copy of our online safety book Hacked at 17.

Were you as inspired by Myana’s bravery as we were? She is standing up for what is right and fighting against fake profiles – and you can join her! If you have a story to share, please send it to info@facechex.com.