Why do we no longer care about privacy?

On February 4, Facebook turned 15 years old. Despite the record profits made in 2018, this will be remembered as the worst year of its history in public relations due to the numerous controversies in which the social network was involved.

Throughout this period, the social network became a company that dominated the world of internet communication. Only Facebook, according to data released by the company itself, now has 2.3 billion users – a third of the global population.

Last year, the Menlo Park, Calif., Company reported a net note of $ 22.1 billion. Along with Google, Facebook controls about 60% of the money invested in online advertising worldwide.

Much of its growth has been built upon the steady erosion of societal norms around privacy, encouraging us to share ever more of our lives with ever more of the world.

Facebook’s ubiquity in digital communications is a double-edged sword. It is the main reason for the company’s extraordinary profits, but also why the company starts to be criticized and monitored with greater attention by regulatory bodies of the different governments of the planet.

Violations of privacy and sale of user data, abuse of advertising practices, the disclosure of false information, platform security, and vulnerabilities to hackers are viewed as the Achilles heel of one of the most powerful Internet companies currently.

As Kalev Leetaru assertively wrote in his Forbes article, “one of the most existential questions of the modern world is why we as a society have accepted the steady erosion of our digital rights and the loss of the concept of privacy.”

“Why do we no longer care about privacy?” is the question Leetaruy tries to answer. In his analysis, Facebook was able to conditionate the entire human race to give up its privacy in return for free access to a global communications network.

Scarlett Johansson opens up about deepfake videos and online exploitation

Earlier this week, the actress Scarlett Johansson talked about a problem she’s been facing for a while: deepfake porn. That’s not the first time she sees her privacy gone viral. In 2012, a hacker was sentenced to 10 years in prison after leaking nude photos of her and other celebrities, setting an example to warn future thieves.

As we mentioned in a previous post, Deepfake videos are generated by the application of a technology similar to the “face swap” used in Instagram and other networks. The algorithm has been used to superimpose faces of women – many of them female personalities – to people in pornographic videos. The result can be highly realistic fake videos.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Johansson has spoken out against deepfakes. One fake video, described as real “leaked” footage, has been watched on a major porn site more than 1.5 million times. “Clearly this doesn’t affect me as much because people assume it’s not actually me in a porno, however demeaning it is. I think it’s up to an individual to fight for their own right to their image, claim damages, etc”, Scarlett comment.

Johansson also mentioned the difficulty in pursuing legally since every country has different laws regarding copyright and the right to your own image. Unfortunately, online exploitation is a long time problem that Facechex is fighting since day one.

“Vulnerable people like women, children and seniors must take extra care to protect their identities and personal content. That will never change no matter how strict Google makes their policies”, she pointed.

“People think that they are protected by their internet passwords and that only public figures or people of interest are hacked. But the truth is, there is no difference between someone hacking my account or someone hacking the person standing behind me on line at the grocery store’s account. It just depends on whether or not someone has the desire to target you.”

FaceChex is an online platform that stops third parties from using your private content without your permission. You can learn more about the company and the technology behind it on our website.

Photo: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock

UK Report warns of the risks involved in exposing data on children in social media and electronic toys.

At first glance, it may seem like something common and harmless, but the exposure of children in the virtual world can be a full plate for big tech companies when it comes to sharing data.

The Who Knows What About Me study by England’s Children’s Commissar Anne Longfield, who works to promote children’s rights, warns of the risks involved in sharing personal information through large technology companies.

In the report, she explains that parents expose their children’s data at a troubling rate. The study estimates that when a child reaches age 18, the volume of content shared over the internet can reach 70,000 posts, and asks parents and schools to examine the types of electronic devices children play with, such as games and toys connected. Longfield argues that these devices can collect data about children, and recommends that governments pressure large technology companies to promote the security of their users’ information.

According to the study, an unimaginable amount of information is being disseminated in new ways because of the emergence of intelligent technologies. Regarding children, this phenomenon may have a greater impact, since they were born in the digital age.

 

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

How FaceChex works

FaceChex is an online platform that stops third parties from using your private content without your permission.

Watch the video below to understand how you can protect yourself.

October is the National Cyber Security Awareness Month

National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) – observed every October – was created as a collaborative effort between government and industry to ensure every American has the resources they need to stay safer and more secure online.

NCSAM has grown exponentially since its inception in 2004, reaching consumers, small and medium-sized businesses, corporations, government entities, the military, educational institutions, and young people nationally and internationally.

It is part of a growing global effort among businesses, government agencies, colleges and universities, associations, nonprofit organizations and individuals to promote the awareness of online safety and privacy.

Among the many topics covered, we find “Stay Safe Online”, “Online Safety Basics”, “Theft, Fraud & Cybercrime”, “Key Account & Devices”, and “Managing your Privacy”.

Click here to read more about our 5 online safety tips.

Teen Online Safety: We’re Writing the Book on it!

Here at FaceChex we are constantly thinking about how to increase online safety for our users…but for teenagers, with work, school, and social lives on their minds, online safety can get put on the back burner.

We want to change that.

We want to create a book, Hacked at 17, written to show teens the importance of protecting themselves online. It tells the real-life stories of people affected by online dangers and offers safety tips for how to avoid becoming a victim of these dangers.

Stories that will be included in the book include those on hacking, sharing inappropriate content, and cyberbullying. These are presented alongside safety guidelines for teens to follow online to avoid these issues.

Any pledge over $1 receives a free copy of a high resolution copy of “A Family’s Guide to Online Safety.” Rewards for backers over $10 range from ebook versions of the text to books donated to high school libraries on your behalf. Any pledge over $50 also gets the bonus of receiving FaceChex scanning along with your copies of the book!

Visit the Kickstarter campaign page to learn more and order your copy of Hacked at 17 to share with your loved ones!